Accelerating the recovery of the European Eel

TRAFFIC report highlights significance of eel trade from North Africa

EASTWARD BOUND. Analysis of CITES-listed flora and fauna exports from Africa to East and Southeast Asia


Eel related information were extracted from (click title for download):
Outhwaite W & Brown L (2018): Eastward Bound: Analysis of CITES-listed flora and fauna exports from Africa to East and Southeast Asia 2016-2015. Traffic International, Cambridge, United Kingdom
Data source: CITES Trade Database, Appendix I and II species

TRAFFIC, 2018


  • North African trade focuses on live European Eels and there meat (p 2)
  • Exports of meat reported in kilogrammes included just three species: Nile Crocodile, European Eel and Cape Fur Seal (p 12)
  • African Strategy on Combating Illegal Exploitation and Illegal Trade in Wild Fauna and Flora adopted by the African Union in May 2015 (p 15)
  • AFRICA-TWIX (Trade Wildlife Information eXchange) (p 16)
  • All exports of individual live European Eel Anguilla Anguilla were from Morocco (170,092) or Tunisia (53,104) (p 22)
  • Exports peaked in 2014 at 197,036: most of which were European Eel from Morocco (163,822) (p 26)
  • All exports reported as kilogrammes in class Actinopteri were of European Eel (p 28)
  • Tunisia and Morocco were the only countries to export Actinopteri meat, all which was European Eel (273,390 kg and 216,650 kg respectively). (p 31)
  • The Republic of Korea imported the most Actinopteri (European Eel) meat (242,082 kg) followed by Hong Kong SAR (193,860 kg) (p 32)
  • According to CITES trade data, between 2006 and 2015 Morocco was the largest exporter to Asia in North Africa: exports totaled 170,092 individuals and an additional 612,656 kg, all of which were European Eel Anguilla Anguilla.
  • The vast majority of exports reported both in number of individuals and kilogrammes were European Eel (p 39)
  • Due to the dominance of European Eel in the trade from North Africa, it is unsurprising that Morocco and Tunisia were the largest exporters of live animals
  • The Republic of Korea being the most important, largely due to its imports of European Eel (223,196 individuals plus 621,181 kg) (p 41)
  • Between 2006 and 2015, a total of 228,052 specimens of CITES-listed species were exported from Morocco and Tunisia combined: most exports were live European Eel Anguilla anguilla (223,196) and European Eel meat (490,040 kg and 4,839 individuals) (p 47)
  • Exports of all live European eels were wild-sourced, except in 2015 when Tunisia and Morocco both exported 2,000 kg of captive-bred eels. (p 47)
  • The largest importer of both live and meat was the Republic of Korea (228,005 individuals and 866,374 kg combined) (p 47)
  • At the 29th Animal Committee (AC29) in 2017, European Eel was included in the Review of Significant Trade (RST) process due to its Endangered status and sharp increase in trade. Trade from Morocco, Tunisia and Algeria will now be assessed to consider its sustainability (p 47)

TRAFFIC, 2018

 

TRAFFIC, 2018



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